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June 9, 2017
M. Thomas
When an adoptive family travels to pick up their new child in the child’s birth country, as an international adoption coordinator, I am anxious during that first week when they meet their child, and breathe easier after the week has passed if I haven’t heard from them.  Why? Because while everyone expects it to be a week of great joy and happiness, I know from my own experience it can be quite the opposite. You see, before I became an adoption professional, I was an adoptive mom.
May 5, 2017
Alex Williams, MSW - Outreach and Program Support Specialist, Project Wait No Longer
 
April 11, 2017
Margeline Thomas
"A Family Is What You Make It" That’s what National Public Radio Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep says.
March 1, 2017
Jennifer, Barker Parent
On an otherwise uneventful Friday in late November 2015, I opened my email to find a message about a little boy from Ann Morrison, the director of the domestic adoption program at Barker. He was two years old, had big beautiful eyes, lived in China, and was diagnosed with hemophilia. My husband and I were approved and waiting for a domestic adoption match, but Ann knew that our hearts were pulling us toward adopting a toddler and Barker was hoping to find that little boy’s family quickly due to his medical needs, so she sent us a little information just in case.
January 23, 2017
Varda Makovsky, Director or Family & Post Adoption Services
We advise anyone who is interested in adoption to see the movie “Lion.” There are many beautiful (and wrenching) aspects of this movie, but one of the aspects we found especially poignant was how technology and the internet can affect adoption.
December 21, 2016
Andrea, Adoptive Mother
Three years ago, my husband and I started the adoption process.  I distinctly remember the information session we attended on December 7, 2013.  I still have my information packet with hand written notes about the different programs!  As I sat in a room with approximately 40 other people, I quickly realized that the adoption process was just that, a process.  I also quickly understood why it was a process; these children deserve every background check, finger print, and home inspection asked of us.   
November 23, 2016
Barker Staff
Each Thanksgiving, the Barker staff reflects with special gratitude on the many families who open their hearts and homes to waiting children. As we celebrate Giving Tuesday, I know you are also inspired and grateful to be a part of this great unfinished work.  Here are lives you’ve helped us touch in recent months:
Categories: Events, Inspiration
November 16, 2016
Stephany West, Program Assistant
When thinking what our domestic infant team could do to help honor Adoption Month, we decided to shine some light on those who work silently and tirelessly behind the scenes – hospital staff. So we decided to deliver baskets of goodies for those who staff the hospitals, pregnancy centers, and clinics that we work with in Washington D.C., Maryland and Virginia.
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September 23, 2016
After a fun-filled sunny day on Sunday, it is safe to say the Barker tradition of the annual picnic being one of the highlights of the year for the Barker community continues strong. In fact, we were thrilled to see over 150 of you at the picnic!
September 23, 2016
Alex Williams, MSW - Outreach and Program Support Specialist, Project Wait No Longer
One of our very own PWNL Moms has been recognized as one of the best Adoptive Mom Blogs of 2016 by Healthline for her blog, Adoptive Black Mom.  Adoptive Black Mom chronicles her adoption journey from the searching process to her every day parenting struggles in an honest and relatable way and gives a voice to people of color involved in adoption. Adoptive Black Mom is a captivating and thoughtful account of what it is like to not only parent a child who has a history of trauma, but what it is like to do it as a single African American mother.

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