Main Office M-F 9 AM-5 PM +1-301-664-9664

24/7 Crisis Pregnancy ONLY Hotline for Maryland/Virginia/DC:+1-888-731-6601 or TEXT: 240-600-1106

PWNL (Older Child) after hours counselor:+1-888-955-3339

 

November 3, 2015
Please join Barker for a provocative and important presentation on a subject too-seldom explored: what black Americans think about transracial adoption.  The featured speaker is Rhonda Roorda, a highly regarded national presenter on transracial adoption, who herself was adopted into a white family.
October 21, 2015
As part of its mission to provide life-long support to all members of the adoption circle, The Barker Adoption Foundation facilitates six ongoing monthly peer support/discussion groups: Adopted Persons’ Discussion Group: Meets on the third Thursday of each month from 7:00-9:00 PM. This group is open to any adopted person over the age of 18 and topics discussed include exploring adoptive identity, relationships with adoptive families and birth family (if applicable) and feelings about search and reunion.
October 20, 2015
Erica Seivright-Potts, LGSW, Pregnancy Counselor
You have decided to make an adoption plan. Your roommate(s), family, friends or coworkers may be aware of your pregnancy or that you had a baby. Naturally, they will inquire about your future plans for yourself and baby. They may even want to help to plan a baby shower for you or recommend day care providers. This might be an awkward moment to inform them of your intention of making an adoption plan for your baby.  Ultimately, who you choose to inform about your decision to make an adoption plan is your choice. Here are some suggestions that you may find helpful:
October 19, 2015
The Barker Adoption Foundation is excited to announce its 2015 Kids Art Contest! 
October 14, 2015
Kate Simpson, Pregnancy Counselor
I encounter a lot of people who think pregnancy counseling won’t play a major part in their adoption experience. These include birth parents and prospective adoptive parents. The truth is that access to quality pregnancy counseling is profoundly important to everyone involved in the adoption process.
September 30, 2015
Varda Makovsky, LCSW-C, Director, Family and Post-Adoption Services
Sunday’s Washington Post Outlook section featured two different stories about evolving adoptee connection with birth family:
September 23, 2015
Beth Kirby, Barker’s Executive Assistant and Cradle Care Coordinator joined the Barker Adoption Foundation team in 1990.  Beth is part of the fabric of Barker. She puts her heart into her work and is integral to the services we provide.  We asked her to sit down for a brief moment, between tasks, and tell us a bit about her work.
September 23, 2015
Kate Simpson, Pregnancy Counselor
So many questions run through the minds of the birth parents I work with, but they often pale in comparison to this one question: How soon can I pick a family for my baby? That makes sense. When a birth parent is facing a flood of questions and concerns, it is comforting to know that the match has been made and to start to imagine what your baby’s life will be like. It is natural to want that comfort as soon as possible. We always try to give the birth parent as much control over their adoption planning process as possible.
September 17, 2015
Kate Simpson, Pregnancy Counselor
Anyone who has ever had to make this difficult phone call knows this scene all too well. You are sitting there looking at a screen. “Pregnant?” it asks you; “You are not alone. Call us!” The website seems welcoming, it promises: no judgment and no pressure. So why is this still so hard? It may be difficult because you don’t know what to expect. You may wish you knew what the call would be like. What will they ask you? How long will the call take? You may already be feeling overwhelmed and unsure whether you even want to talk to someone. Let me share a few things that may be helpful.
September 14, 2015
Kate Simpson, LGSW, Pregnancy Counselor
Birth parents are free to choose the family who adopts their baby.  Often, when the time comes, a birth mother sits with baited breath, barely able to get through the greetings and pleasantries. All she wants is to see the profiles of the families who met the criteria she gave her pregnancy counselor. She has some very specific hopes in mind. The list varies from birth parent to birth parent. Perhaps this birth mother wanted her child to be the first, or perhaps she was hoping for her child to have a sibling.

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